Who You Really Are

Rhema TeamJune/July 2019 WOF, WOF Current IssueLeave a Comment

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When you look into a mirror, what do you see? Most people answer by naming different physical features. But look a little deeper. What do you see on the inside? To be all God called you to be, look into the mirror of your life. As you do, you will discover who you really are and what needs to change.

Often, we can easily see where others need to change. Instead of looking at others, we should look at ourselves. Mirrors show everything. The mirror of our life reveals our thoughts, actions, intents, and agendas. It’s important to find out who we really are and allow the Lord to show us where to make adjustments.

Have you ever been in a house of mirrors at an amusement park? Those mirrors distort our reflections. Sometimes we look tall and thin. In other mirrors, we appear short and fat.

In the same way, the view we have of our inner selves is distorted depending on the “mirror” we look in. Here are four different mirrors we view ourselves through.

Hazy Mirrors

When a mirror becomes hazy, it’s usually the result of residue buildup. We can’t see things as they really are. Spiritually speaking, this residue looks like pride, strife, unforgiveness, jealousy, and gossip. It can also manifest as thinking more highly of ourselves than we should or having a judgmental attitude.

The Bible tells us to be conformed into God’s image (Rom. 8:29). If we see any of these ungodly attitudes, we need to clean the dirt off our mirror so we can reflect Christ’s characteristics in all we say and do.

Tiny Mirrors

Most women carry small mirrors in their purses. But because of its size, we only see what we want to see. Our mothers may have said, “Honey, you need to get that smudge off your face,” and handed you her mirror. No doubt, you looked and tried to fix it. But if you couldn’t wipe it off or you didn’t want to fix it, you probably ignored it or covered it up.

We sometimes ignore certain “smudges”—attitudes or habits—because we don’t want to change. But if we don’t allow the Lord to speak to us, it results in sin or a weight. Refusing to examine ourselves and make adjustments keeps us from fulfilling God’s plan and living the abundant life He has for us.

God wants us to have more than a revelation of Christ. He wants us to be a reflection of Him.Lynette Hagin

Broken Mirrors

Sometimes mirrors become cracked, and we can’t see ourselves because of the broken pieces. It’s impossible to get beyond past mistakes and hurts if that is what we always look at. The Bible tells us to forget “the past and look to what lies ahead” (Phil. 3:13).

Most people have been wronged or experienced rejection. Some have suffered abuse as a child or an adult. As long as we keep dwelling on these situations, the wounds will stay open. We will remain a victim and never become a victor. We can’t continually look in a shattered mirror and move forward. Is it hard to forgive? Yes, absolutely. But Paul tells us to “Fix your thoughts on what is true, and honorable, and right, and pure, and lovely, and admirable. Think about things that are excellent and worthy of praise” (Phil. 4:8 NLT).

The Mirror of God’s Word

Mirrors reflect light. As Christians, the light of God’s Word should be what reflects in our mirrors. Psalm 119:105 (NLT) says, “Your word is a lamp to guide my feet and a light for my path.”

If our lives aren’t going in the right direction, maybe we have let the wrong light shine on us. Perhaps we are reflecting images we have watched through television, movies, social media, or secular music. People’s opinions and the demands of life may have become our light instead of the One Who is Light.

God wants us to have more than a revelation of Christ. He wants us to be a reflection of Him. Let’s allow the light of the Word to reflect from our mirrors. Let it correct areas in our lives so God’s light fills us, and we become a light to the world.

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It’s important to find out who we really are and allow the Lord to show us where to make adjustments.



[Editor's note: This article was adapted from Kenneth W. Hagin's book Listen to Your Heart.]

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Lynette Hagin

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